Yesterday evening, I gave a talk on AOP at DePaul University called Aspect-Oriented Programming in Academia and Industry. Here's the PDF. This talk was a little different than the usual talks I give. Since this audience was mostly students and faculty, I wanted to show how groups in both industry and academia were looking at similar problems that led to the emergence of AOP, how they each contributed to AOP in different ways, and how they can continue complementing each other's work on emerging trends, like Language-Oriented Programming. Language-Oriented Programming is not a new idea, but it is getting renewed attention recently. I see it as a way of formalizing our understanding of how Domain-Specific Languages should be designed. I'm a little concerned that everyone will get so excited about crafting "elegant" DSLs that we'll end up with a Tower of Babel situation; lots of gratuitously-different ways of describing the same thing and no one getting much work done. Anyway, we'll see...

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